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Course Offerings

The following expanding content lists include current course offerings for the 2023 Spring Semester as well as courses taught in previous semesters. 

A full list of courses taught in the College of Health may be found on the University Catalog website.

Questions about registration? Email: cohadvising@lehigh.edu 

Spring 2023

BIOSTATISTICS

Population Health Data Science I *
BSTA 001-010 | CRN:14738 | 3 credits | MW | 12:10-1:25p | UG level
Instructor: John Hughes

Students will learn the fundamentals of probability theory, univariate statistics, statistical computing/programming/visualization, and machine learning. A mix of traditional and experiential learning will focus on how to build an analysis pipeline to answer pressing questions in population health. In-class examples and projects will use real data sets. Students will propose a small data-driven project focused on population health, and use their newly-acquired data science skills to collect, analyze, and present their work.
*Must be taken in conjunction with BSTA 002 (Lab) | Reserved seating

Population Health Data Science I Algorithms Lab *
BSTA 002-061 | CRN:14736 | 1 credit | F | 10:45a-1:25p | UG level
BSTA 002-062 | CRN:14748 | 1 credit | F | 1:35-4:15p | UG level

Instructor: Linchen He
Students will apply statistical concepts learned in BSTA 001 Population Health Data Science I to describe, visualize, and draw inferences on a variety of health datasets using Python3. Datasets that students will study include: influenza-like illness and confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 tracked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and a repository of potentially hazardous chemicals found in commercial products.
*POPH Major requirement; lab must be taken concurrently with lecture BSTA 001-010, CRN 14738

Introduction to Programming in R *
BSTA 095-010 | CRN:14749 | 3 credits | MW | 3:00-4:15p | UG level
Instructor: John Hughes
 
Problem solving using the R environment for statistical computing and graphics. Algorithm design and development. Data types, input, and output, control flow, functional programming. Exploratory data analysis, including descriptive statistics and basic methods of visual presentation.
*Reserved seating

Outbreak Science & Public Health Forecasting
BSTA 395-010 | CRN:13843 | 3 credits | TR | 12:10-1:25p | UG level
BSTA 495-010 | CRN 14776 | 3 credits | TR | 12:10-1:25p | GR level
Instructor: Thomas McAndrew

This course aims to introduce students to models that describe the spread of a pathogen through a population, and how models can support public health decisions. The course will be split into four parts: (i) the factors that motivate public health actions, (ii) epidemic models such as the Reed-Frost and SIR, (iii) statistical time series and forecasts, and (ii) a focus on ensemble building. Students will be expected to complete mathematical/statistical exercises and write code that simulates infectious processes.

Applications in Statistical Learning
BSTA 403-010 | CRN: 14636 | 3 credits | W | 5:50-8:30p | GR level
Instructor: Bilal Khan 

This course will explore common statistical models used to analyze both continuous, discrete, and time-to-event data: simple and multivariate linear regression, logistic regression, poison and negative binomial regression, and survival models. An emphasis will be placed on supervised learning. Throughout the semester, students will apply the theoretical background they learn in class to population health data sets, generating their own hypotheses and testing them with rigorous statistical methods.

COMMUNITY AND GLOBAL HEALTH

Community Health *
CGH 001-010 | CRN:14858 | 3 credits | TR | 01:35-2:50p | UG level
Instructor: Kate Jackson

The interdisciplinary field of community health focuses on improving the health of communities through health promotion and disease prevention, education, policy development, and community empowerment. This course provides students with an overview of theoretical, methodological, and practical aspects of community health with a focus on working in diverse communities. Students will gain an understanding of how community-level health issues relate to broader contextual issues within the community and externally.
*Reserved seating

Careers in Community and Global Health Studies
CGH 101-010 | CRN:14862 | 3 credits | M | 7:15-9:55p | UG level
Instructor: Ryan Goeckner

In this interdisciplinary seminar, students will be exposed to individuals working in community and global health in academic positions, government and non-governmental organizations, community-based organizations, medical establishments, industry, and more. Through the eyes of these professionals, students will learn of career opportunities in these growing fields of study and will begin to chart their own career paths.

Biological & Environmental Determinants of Health*
CGH 103-010 | CRN:13826 | 4 credits | MW | 9:20-10:35a | UG level
Instructor: Joseph Pacheco

This course provides students with a foundational knowledge of the biological mechanisms underlying health and disease. Students will learn about the evolutionary genetic basis of disease and the major disease transitions throughout history, all driven by interactions between the genetic composition of individuals and groups and their natural and built environment. Students will become familiar with the various infectious agents causing disease and the human immune response, as well as the biological determinants of chronic diseases. Not for biology majors.
*Reserved seating

Qualitative Methods in Health Research*
CGH 106-010 | CRN:14870 | 3 credits | TR | 3:00-4:15p | UG level
Instructor: Rochelle Frounfelker

This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of qualitative data collection and analysis methods used in community and global health research. Students will learn about data collection using participation and observation, interviews, and focus groups. Students will also learn about text analysis and presenting qualitative results. This course is not designed to provide an in-depth examination of these methods or practical experience, but rather an introduction to their uses and how they complement quantitative methods.
*Reserved seating

Community Health & Engineering*
CGH 195-010 | CRN:14875 | 3 credits | MW | 01:35-2:50p | UG level
Instructor: Gabrielle String

This course is an introduction to public health engineering. Students will learn to define hazards and risks to community health such as air pollution; water, sanitation, and hygiene; food; and settlement/safety. The focus of the course will be on understanding engineering controls to reduce risk and improve communicable and non-communicable disease outcomes. This course includes elements of waterborne disease control, hazardous materials management, occupational health and safety, and environmental interventions.
*Reserved seating

Healthcare Finance
CGH 331-010 | CRN:14966 | 3 credits | TR | 3:00-4:15p | UG level
Instructor: Xinliang (Albert) Liu

This foundation course will introduce students to the key financial management principles, concepts and techniques as applied to health services organizations. This course will cover financial analysis and reporting, revenue sources and reimbursement methods, working capital management, revenue cycle management, and capital budgeting techniques used in the healthcare industry.

Community Based Participatory Research Methodology
CGH 375-010 | CRN:15005 | 3 credits | TR | 10:45a-12:00p | UG level
Instructor: Kathryn Jackson

The course provides an introduction to the core concepts of community based participatory research (CBPR) methodology applied to social science research to address public health issues. The course will equip students with strategies for developing community academic partnerships as well as to strengthen skills in research methods.

Global Environmental Disasters & Policy*
CGH 395-010 | CRN:14967 | 3 credits | MW 12:10-1:25p | UG level
Instructor: Joseph Pacheco

Disasters can leave individuals, communities, and nations reeling to pick up the pieces. This course will look at case studies of major global disasters, including those created by people and nature, and the global magnitude of these disasters. Students will analyze disaster preparedness policies enacted in response to these disasters and learn about the inequalities that disproportionately impact marginalized communities in the aftermath.
*Reserved seating

Medical Mysteries*
CGH 396-010 | CRN: 15134 | 3 credits | TR 9:20-10:35a | UG level
Instructor: Christine Daley

Everything is a mystery until it is solved, including in medicine. This course begins with an exploration of historical medical mysteries and a discussion of what happened after they were solved as a foundation for understanding the present. Students will then learn what differential diagnosis is and what happens when it leaves you with nothing. The course culminates in an examination of a series of current medical mystery case studies in the realms of physical, mental, and spiritual health.
*Reserved seating

Advanced Commercial Determinants of Health
CGH 397-010 | CRN:14997 |3 credits | MW | 10:45a-12:00p | UG level
CGH 497-010 | CRN:15001 | 3 credits | MW | 10:45a-12:00p | GR level
Instructor: Eduardo Gomez

In this upper-level course, students will learn the roles that major soda, food, tobacco, entertainment, and pharmaceutical industries play in affecting population health. This course reveals how and why these industries influence consumption, mental health, and social interactions within communities; how government, civil society, and the international community is responding; and industry's strategic response. This course is reading and writing intensive and employs comparative qualitative case study methods and analysis.

EPIDEMIOLOGY

Methods in Epidemiology 1* I 4 credits | Must register for both sections
EPI 304-110 | CRN:15010 | MW | 10:45a-12:00p | Lecture | UG level
EPI 304-111 | CRN:15013 | M | 3:00-4:15p | Recitation | UG level
Instructor: Russell McIntire

Epidemiology is the field of scientific inquiry concerned with questions about the determinants of disease in the population. This course covers fundamental concepts of epidemiological thinking including study design and analytical methods to address confounding, bias, and effect modification. Students will be introduced to measures of disease frequency and association, sources of bias and how to address them, and concepts in causal inference. Case studies will address health concerns from infectious disease outbreaks to population health surveillance and disease prevention.
*Reserved seating

Methods in Epidemiology II | 4 credits | Must register for both sections
EPI 305-110 | CRN:15014 | MW | 01:35-2:50p | Lecture | UG level
EPI 305-111 | CRN:15015 | W | 3:00-4:15p | Recitation | UG level
Instructor: Russell McIntire

To investigate complicated questions in epidemiology, this second course offers a deeper, expanded view of concepts and methods for observational epidemiological studies. Topics include detailed coverage of clinical trials, cohort studies, case-control study variants and analytical methods. Includes the use of multivariable models to adjust for confounding effects and to estimate interaction effects, and applications of machine learning. Deeper concepts in causal inference are examined through the use of directed acyclic graphs.

Spatial Epidemiology
EPI 395-010 | CRN:15016 | 3 credits | TR | 3:00-4:15p | UG level
Instructor: Jong Cheol Shin

This course will provide students with an introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and its application in population health. It is primarily intended for students in Population Health, but students from other programs will also get good exposure to the capabilities of GIS in health science. The course is designed to teach a mix of practical skills and fundamental concepts. The first half focuses on basic skills and concepts, while the second half focuses on using GIS for analysis.

Environmental Epidemiology & Exposure Science
EPI 396-010 | CRN:15017 | 3 credits | R | 7:15-9:55p | UG level
Instructor: Linchen He

Environmental epidemiology examines the associations of diseases with occupational exposures and other environmental risk factors. Exposure science is the study of contact between humans and environmental risk factors, and it plays a fundamental role in the development and application of epidemiology, toxicology, and risk assessment. This course aims to engage students to understand the relationship between environmental exposure and human health, learn how to conduct exposure assessments, and know the application to promote and protect human health.

Methods in Epidemiology I
EPI 404-010 | CRN:15018 | 3 credits |TR | 4:25-5:40p | GR level | In-person or hybrid
EPI 404-D10 | CRN:15019 | 3 credits |TR | 4:25-5:40p | GR level | Remote only
Instructor: Staff

Epidemiology is the field of scientific inquiry concerned with questions about the determinants of disease in the population. This course covers fundamental concepts of epidemiological thinking including study design and analytical methods to address confounding, bias, and effect modification. Students will be introduced to measures of disease frequency and association, sources of bias and how to address them, and concepts in causal inference. Case studies will address health concerns from infectious disease outbreaks to population health surveillance and disease prevention.

POPULATION HEALTH

Introduction to Population and Public Health *
POPH 001-010 | CRN:15020 | 4 credits | TR | 12:10-1:25p | UG level
Instructor: Jong Cheol Shin

Despite significant advances in medicine and public health, inequities in health persist. Understanding health on a population level is an approach that seeks to improve the health of the whole population, unravel variations in health outcomes, and to identify effective strategies for reducing or eliminating inequities. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of: 1) how population and public health are defined and measured; and 2) the determinants of population health.
*Reserved seating

Population Health Research Methods & Application *
POPH 002-010 | CRN:13326 | 4 credits | TR | 10:45a-12:00p | UG level
Instructor: Fathima Wakeel

This course provides students with fundamental principles of research methods relevant to population health and the translation of research into practice. Through this course, we will review a range of study designs, including experimental and observational studies, mixed methods, and comparative qualitative case study methods. In addition, students will obtain the skills needed to translate research into practice for multiple stakeholder groups.
*Reserved seating

Careers in Population Health
POPH 104-010 | CRN:15021 | 3 credits | M | 7:15-9:55p | UG level
Instructor: Ashlee Simon

In this interdisciplinary seminar, students will be exposed to individuals working in various disciplines with the field of population health in academic positions, government and non-governmental organizations, community-based organizations, medical establishments, industry, and more. Through the eyes of these professionals, students will learn of career opportunities in these growing fields of study and will begin to chart their own career paths.

Introduction to Maternal and Child Health
POPH 105-010 | CRN:15022 | 3 credits | TR | 01:35-2:50p | UG level
Instructor: Fathima Wakeel

The course introduces the student to the Maternal and Child Health field. Students will examine the multi-dimensional determinants of maternal and child health issues using a Life Course approach. Students will also explore the roles of research, programs, policy, and advocacy in the reduction of maternal and child health disparities.

Global Environment and Human Welfare
POPH 106-010 | CRN:15023 | 3 credits | MW | 09:20-10:35a | UG level
Instructor: Hyunok Choi

This course investigates the present understanding of multiple pollution agents and their effects on human health and well-being. The students will examine the history, the emergence, the known risks from exposure to specific pollutants through multiple media (e.g. air, water, food) with a particular focus on air pollution. Through readings, discussions, and a project, students are expected to cultivate a critical understanding of the risks posed by environmental pollutants on human health and identify knowledge gaps.

Technology, Simulation, and Health
POPH 395-010 | CRN:15034 | 3 credits | F | 12:10-2:50p | UG level
POPH 495-010 | CRN:15035 | 3 credits | F | 12:10-2:50p | GR level
Instructor: Shan Li

This course provides an introduction to the technology-based environments (e.g., intelligent tutoring systems, serious games, and immersive technologies) designed for health education, promotion, and intervention. We will explore how the features of technology-based environments improve health outcomes among different populations, and we discuss the theoretical models and educational theories guiding the design of those environments.

Population Health Bioethics
POPH 396-010 | CRN:15037 | 3 credits | MW | 3:00-4:15p | UG level
Instructor: Michael Gusmano

This course will focus on macro-level bioethical dilemmas that arise outside the clinic, at the level of the population, the state, the country, or the globe. Population health policies raise questions about autonomy, individual rights, coercion, justice, community, the meaning of the common good, norms of research, and multi-cultural values. The course will explore a range of questions, including: how to conceptualize, measure and evaluate health inequalities?; how should we set spending priorities?; is paternalism acceptable?

Social Determinants of Population Health
POPH 409-010 | CRN:15040 | 3 credits | T | 5:50-8:30p | GR level | In-person or hybrid
POPH 409-D10 | CRN:15041 | 3 credits | T | 5:50-8:30p | GR level | Remote only
Instructor: Rochelle Frounfelker

This course will look at cultural and social institutions, as well as other components of culture, society, and social structure, that affect health and the health outcomes at the individual and community-levels. Topics to be analyzed include cultural traditions, social norms, politics, economics, housing, transportation, and subsistence strategies, just to name a few. Additionally, specific illnesses, sicknesses, and diseases linked to cultural and social institutions and the human experience will also be explored.

Population Health Bioethics
POPH 496-010 | CRN:15039 | 3 credits | MW | 3:00-4:15p | GR level | In-person or hybrid
POPH 496-D10 | CRN:15131 | 3 credits | MW | 3:00-4:15p | GR level | Remote only
Instructor: Michael Gusmano

This course will focus on macro-level bioethical dilemmas that arise outside the clinic, at the level of the population, the state, the country, or the globe. Population health policies raise questions about autonomy, individual rights, coercion, justice, community, the meaning of the common good, norms of research, and multi-cultural values. The course will explore a range of questions, including: how to conceptualize, measure and evaluate health inequalities?; how should we set spending priorities?; is paternalism acceptable?

Teaching Community & Population Health
POPH 497-010 | CRN:15042 | 3 credits | W | 1:35-4:15p | GR level
Instructor: Sean Daley

This course is designed for doctoral students in community health and population health to learn about teaching and course development. Students will learn about the pragmatic aspects of curriculum design, including syllabus design, how to select readings, assignment and exam design, grading and rubric design, creating lectures and slides, lecturing, and leading discussions for different levels of learners. Students will also gain practical experience in these areas and will create a new community or population health course.

PUBLIC HEALTH

Health Services, Administration, Politics, and Policy
PUBH 402-010 | CRN:15043 | 3 credits | R | 5:50-8:30p | GR level | In-person or hybrid
PUBH 402-D10 | CRN:15044 | 3 credits | R | 5:50-8:30p | GR level | Remote only
​​​​​​​Instructor: Xinliang (Albert) Liu

This course will provide students with an overview of how the U.S. healthcare system works. Students will learn the federal, state, and local administration of healthcare services, as well as the implementation process. We will also address the various phases of the health policy-making process, across several sectors. A comparative analysis of the differences between public versus private healthcare service provision will also be provided. We will conclude with comparisons between the US and other countries.

 

Fall 2022

BSTA 005 | Statistical Literacy in Health  
Section: 010 | TR 3:00-4:15p | CRN: 45644 | 3 credits
Instructor: Professor Tom McAndrew 

This course is designed to introduce students with a fear of all things mathematical to the importance of statistics in health research. Students will learn how to read and understand basic statistical concepts used in health research and in popular discussions about health in the media. Students will also learn how to present statistical health data in a way that people without a statistical background can understand it.

BSTA 101 | Population Health Data Science II    
Section: 010 | TR 12:10-1:25p | CRN: 44737 | 3 credits
Instructor: Professor Tom McAndrew 
 
Students will expand their statistics and machine learning toolkit by learning how to compare univariate distributions, build traditional regression models for continuous and binary data, explore supervised learning methods such as: Tree-based learning, KNN/Collaborative filtering, and Feed forward Neural networks, and understand how to manipulate, ask, and answer questions from big datasets. Students will be expected to propose a population health project mid-semester, and apply and present techniques they learned in class. May be taken in conjunction with BSTA 103.

BSTA 103 | Population Health Data Science II Algorithms Lab 
Section: 060 |F 10:45a-1:25p | CRN: 44750 |1 credit
Instructor: Professor Linchen He
 
Students will apply regression and machine learning models learned in BSTA101 Population Health Data Science II to health datasets using Python3. Datasets that students will study include: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, influenza-like illness and confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 tracked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Health Interview Survey. Lab is to be taken concurrently with lecture (BSTA 101 Population Health Data Science II)  

BSTA 103 | Population Health Data Science II Algorithms Lab         
Section: 061 | F 1:35-4:15p | CRN: 44751 | 1 credit
Instructor: Professor Linchen He

Students will apply regression and machine learning models learned in BSTA101 Population Health Data Science II to health datasets using Python3. Datasets that students will study include: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, influenza-like illness and confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 tracked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Health Interview Survey. Lab is to be taken concurrently with lecture (BSTA101 Population Health Data Science II)

BSTA 402 | Health Data and Computational Science
Section: 010 | M 4:25-7:05p | CRN: 45103 | 3 credits (On Campus)
 
Section: 011 | M 4:25-7:05p | CRN: 45652 | 3 credits (Remote)
Instructor: Professor John Hughes  

Students will learn the fundamentals of probability theory, univariate statistics, statistical computing/programming/visualization, supervised and machine learning. We will focus on theoretical concepts and on writing code in Python to apply what we learn in class to real-life population health examples such as: health policy, infectious disease, clinical trials, and data collected from national databases. A mix of traditional and experiential learning applied to real-life population health data will equip students with statistical tools to answer pressing population health problems.

CGH 001 | Community Health  
Section: 010 | MW 12:10-1:25p | CRN: 44733 | 3 credits
Instructor: Professor Kathryn Jackson
 
The interdisciplinary field of community health focuses on improving the health of communities through health promotion and disease prevention, education, policy development, and community empowerment. This course provides students with an overview of theoretical, methodological, and practical aspects of community health with a focus on working in diverse communities. Students will gain an understanding of how community-level health issues relate to broader contextual issues within the community and externally.

CGH 004 |  Introduction to Global Health 
Section: 010 | MW 10:45a-12:00p | CRN: 44739 | 3 credits
Instructor: Professor Eduardo Gomez
   
In this course, students will receive an introduction to global population health. We begin with an analysis of the rise of the international community in addressing population health needs, and the international norms guiding healthcare delivery systems. We will also focus on healthcare delivery systems, innovations, and policy reforms in response to healthcare needs in several developing nations. Finally, students will understand the political, social, and more recent commercial determinants of population health in these countries.

CGH 007 | Seven Dimensions of Health & Wellness 
Section: 010 | TR 9:20-10:35a | CRN: 44818 | 3 credits
Instructor: Professor Christine Daley  
 
Much has been discussed in the public sphere about happiness and how an individual can achieve peak happiness. This course delves more holistically into health and wellness, moving beyond individual happiness and towards a multi-level understanding of how interactions with others and the environment impact the self. Using a multi-disciplinary approach, students will learn the seven dimensions of health and wellness, including physical, mental, emotional, spiritual, cultural, environmental, and community, and how they interact to create healthy people and communities. 

CGH 021 | Culture and Health 
Section: 010 | TR 1:35-2:50p | CRN: 44734 | 3 credits
Instructor: Professor Ryan Goeckner 
 
This course will introduce students to the complex and dynamic relationship between culture and health in Western and non-Western populations, communities, and societies. Cross-cultural institutions such as economics, politics, kinship, religion, and language, and their roles in sickness and illness will be discussed. The relationship between traditional and modern healing systems will also be analyzed.

CGH 104 | Sociocultural & Political Determinants of Health  
Section: 010 | MW 9:20-10:35a | CRN: 45104 | 4 credits
Instructor: Professor Sean Daley 
 
This course will look at cultural, social, and political institutions, as well as other components of culture, society, and social structure, that affect health and the health outcomes at the individual and community-levels. Topics to be analyzed include cultural traditions, social norms, politics, laws and policies, economics, housing, transportation, and subsistence strategies, just to name a few. Additionally, specific illnesses, sicknesses, and diseases linked to cultural, social, and political institutions in the human experience will be explored.

CGH 106 | Qualitative Methods in Health Research   
Section: 010 | TR 12:10-1:25p | CRN: 45647 | 3 credits
Instructor: Professor Rochelle Frounfelker 
          
This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of qualitative data collection and analysis methods used in community and global health research. Students will learn about data collection using participation and observation, interviews, and focus groups. Students will also learn about text analysis and presenting qualitative results. This course is not designed to provide an in-depth examination of these methods or practical experience, but rather an introduction to their uses and how they complement quantitative methods.

CGH 107 | US Healthcare Ecosystem 
Section: 010 | MW 1:35-2:50p | CRN: 45105 | 3 credits
Instructor: Professor Xinliang (Albert) Liu   

This course examines the structure, functioning, financing, and performance of the U.S. healthcare system. It aims to provide a general overview of the relationships between healthcare consumers, providers, organizations, payers, and regulators. The course will cover the history of the U.S. healthcare system and the political and social environment in which it exists and compare it to systems from other countries.

CGH 322 | Contemporary Indigenous Health  
Section: 010 | TR 3:00-4:15p | CRN: 45106 | 3 credits
Instructor: Professor Sean Daley
   
In this course, students will learn about the health issues Indigenous peoples of the Americas and their communities presently face. Prevalent diseases will be explored, as well as social, economic, and political issues affecting access to treatment and care. Historical and contemporary laws and policies affecting Indigenous health will also be analyzed. Additionally, Indigenous responses to contemporary health concerns will be explored including decolonization, food sovereignty, and cultural reclamation.

CGH 332 |  Aging, Health, and Social Policy 
Section: 010 | T 7:15-9:55p | CRN: 45649 | 3 credits
Instructor: Professor Michael Gusmano
             
This course describes and evaluates the health and social policy consequences of population aging in the U.S. and abroad. The course begins with an exploration of global trends in aging, longevity, and health. Next, we examine cross-national responses to population aging with case studies from higher, middle, and lower income countries. 

EPI 304 | Methods in Epidemiology I
Section 110 | MW 12:10-1:25p | CRN: 45107 | Lecture
Section 111 | W 3:00-3:50p | CRN 45407 | Recitation
4 credits | Must register for both sections
Instructor: Professor Russell McIntire

Epidemiology is the field of scientific inquiry concerned with questions about the determinants of disease in the population. This course covers fundamental concepts of epidemiological thinking including study design and analytical methods to address confounding, bias, and effect modification. Students will be introduced to measures of disease frequency and association, sources of bias and how to address them, and concepts in causal inference. Case studies will address health concerns from infectious disease outbreaks to population health surveillance and disease prevention

EPI 305 | Methods in Epidemiology II
Section 110 | TR 1:35-2:50p | CRN: 45108 | Lecture
Section 111 | T 3:00-3:50p | CRN 45409 | Recitation
4 credits | Must register for both sections
Instructor: Professor Russell McIntire

To investigate complicated questions in epidemiology, this second course offers a deeper, expanded view of concepts and methods for observational epidemiological studies. Topics include detailed coverage of clinical trials, cohort studies, case-control study variants and analytical methods. Includes the use of multivariable models to adjust for confounding effects and to estimate interaction effects, and applications of machine learning. Deeper concepts in causal inference are examined through the use of directed acyclic graphs.

POPH 001 | Introduction to Population Health  
Section: 010 | TR 10:45a-12:00p | CRN: 43957 | 4 credits
Instructor: Professor Jong Cheol Shin

Despite significant advances in medicine and public health, inequities in health persist. Understanding health on a population level is an approach that seeks to improve the health of the whole population, unravel variations in health outcomes, and to identify effective strategies for reducing or eliminating inequities. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of: 1) how population health defined and measured; and 2) the determinants of population health (from cell to society).

POPH 101 | History of Population Health 
Section: 010 | MW 1:35-2:50p | CRN: 43955 | 3 credits
Instructor: Professor Eduardo Gomez  
 
This course introduces students to the development of population health as a convergent science. Students will learn about the evolution of population health interests, normative beliefs in service delivery, and policy at the international and domestic level. The principles, ethical values and services enforced by law will be learned. Students will explore the initiatives, collectively achieved among various sectors, addressing the determinants of health. We conclude by addressing future population health challenges, such as the environment, non-communicable diseases, and inequalities.

POPH 106 | Global Environment and Human Welfare  
Section: 010 | MW 12:10-1:25p | CRN: 43949 | 3 credits
Instructor: Professor Hyunok Choi
    
This course investigates the present understanding of multiple pollution agents and their effects on human health and well-being. The students will examine the history, the emergence, the known risks from exposure to specific pollutants through multiple media (e.g. air, water, food) with a particular focus on air pollution. Through readings, discussions, and a project, students are expected to cultivate a critical understanding of the risks posed by environmental pollutants on human health and identify knowledge gaps.

POPH 401 | Population Health Concepts and Methods 
Section: 010 |  W 7:15-9:55p | CRN: 45109 | 3 credits (On campus) 
 
Section: 011 | W 7:15-9:55p | CRN: 45653 | 3 credits (Remote)
Instructor: Professor Whitney Szmodis
  
In this introductory graduate course, students will apply foundational concepts related to the definition and measurement of health and disease as well as the multiple determinants of population health (from cell to society). Students will then apply the fundamental principles of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies in order to integrate the multiple determinants of health in population health research and practice. This course will also explore the translation of research findings to programmatic intervention and policy development.

POPH 403 | Biological Basis of Pop Health: Concepts & Methods 
Section: 010 | T 4:25-7:05p | CRN: 45111 | 3 credits (On campus)

Section: 011 | T 4:25-7:05p | CRN: 45654 | 3 credits (Remote)
Instructor: Professor Joseph Pacheco

In this graduate course, students will investigate the biological mechanisms underlying population health outcomes as well as the roles of individual and group susceptibility to disease. Students will also explore and apply the emerging and traditional tools used in genomic, molecular, immunological, and environmental fields. Students will then integrate the biological and societal determinants of health in order to propose programmatic and policy interventions that promote health and prevent disease.

POPH 431 | Environmental Health Sciences: Concepts & Methods 
Section: 010 | W 4:25-7:05p | CRN: 45113 | 3 credits (On Campus)  
 
Section: 011 | W  4:25-7:05p | | CRN: 45655 | 3 credits (Remote)
  
Instructor: Professor Hyunok Choi
This course introduces key concepts and methods, such as exposure science, epidemiology, toxicology, biomarkers/omics, risk assessment, implementation science, and policy, in order to deepen the understanding of the relationship between major emerging environmental issues and human health. Specifically, the students will apply key tools to explain the relationship between global-, regional, and local-scale environmental contributors to human health outcomes.

PUBH 401 | Health Promotion and Education
Section: 010 | R 4:25-7:05p  | CRN: 45114 | 3 credits (On Campus)  

Section: 011 | R 4:25-7:05p | CRN: 45656 | 3 credits (Remote)  
Instructor: Professor Rajika Reed
In this course, students will gain a deeper insight into the key conceptual frameworks used in health behavior change, promotion, and education. Students will apply these concepts to specific health behaviors, including tobacco use, alcohol use, substance use, obesity and eating behaviors, physical activity, unintentional injury, workplace injury, violence, and risky sexual behaviors. Students will also explore cross-cutting topics such as behavioral economics, patient and consumer activation, patient communication, cultural competence, risk assessment, chronic conditions and depressive disorders.

Summer 2022

CGH 096 | Introduction to LGBTQ2+ Health
Section 010 | TR 2:00p - 4:45p | CRN: 23584 | 3 credits
Instructors: Professor Elizabeth Dolan & Christine Daley

This class introduces students to the health of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, and two-spirited (LGBTQ2+) populations in the United States and globally.  Using an interdisciplinary approach, the course will focus on determinants of health, disparities faced by LGBTQ2+ people, health activism, the history of LGBTQ2+ health, and cross-cultural constructs of identity as they relate to health.  The course focuses on both individual voices and community-wide perspectives to provide a holistic understanding of health. Instruction for this course will be held in HST 154.

CGH 107 | US Healthcare Ecosystem
Section 010 | TR 4:00p - 6:50p | CRN: 23449 | 3 credits
Instructor: Professor Albert Liu

This course examines the structure, functioning, financing, and performance of the U.S. healthcare system. It aims to provide a general overview of the relationships between healthcare consumers, providers, organizations, payers, and regulators. The course will cover the history of the U.S. healthcare system and the political and social environment in which it exists and compare it to systems from other countries.

EPI 304/404 | Methods in Epidemiology I
Section 010 | TR 4:00p - 5:50p | CRN: 23463 | 4 credits (UG)
Section 010 | TR 4:00p - 5:50p | CRN: 23576 | 3 credits (GR)
Instructor: Professor Hyunok Choi

Epidemiology is the field of scientific inquiry concerned with questions about the determinants of disease in the population. This course covers fundamental concepts of epidemiological thinking including study design and analytical methods to address confounding, bias, and effect modification. Students will be introduced to measures of disease frequency and association, sources of bias and how to address them, and concepts in causal inference. Case studies will address health concerns from infectious disease outbreaks to population health surveillance and disease prevention.

Spring 2022

BSTA 001 | Population Health Data Science I 3 credits

BSTA 002 | Population Health Data Science I Algorithms Lab | 3 credits

BSTA 395 | Applied Machine Learning for Health Sciences | 3 credits | provisional offering

BSTA 396 | Advanced R Programming | 3 credits | provisional offering

BSTA 397 | Nonparametric Statistics | 3 credits | provisional offering

CGH 101 | Careers in Community and Global Health Studies | 3 credits

CGH 103 | Biological & Environmental Determinants of Health | 3 credits

CGH 105 | Commercial Determinants of Health | 3 credits

CGH 122 | Indigenous Healing Traditions | 3 credits

CGH 395 | Cross-National Comparisons of Health Systems & Policy | 3 credits | provisional offering

CGH 396 | Healthcare Finance | 3 credits | provisional offering

EPI 304 | Methods in Epidemiology I | 4 credits

POPH 002 | Population Health Research Methods & Application | 3 credits

POPH 195 | Health, Government and the Media | 3 credits | provisional offering

Fall 2021

BSTA 101 | Population Health Data Science II | 3c.

BSTA 103 | Population Health Data Science II Algorithms Lab | 1c.

CGH 001 | Community Health | 3c.

CGH 004 | Introduction to Global Population Health | 3c.

CGH 007 | 7 Dimensions of Health & Wellness | 3c.

CGH 021 | Culture and Health | 3c.

CGH/POP 197 | What is the US Healthcare Ecosystem? | 3c. | Provisional offering

EPI 196 | Introduction to Why | 3c. | Provisional offering

HIT 010 | Seminar: Design Thinking for Innovation in Health | 1c.

POPH 001 | Introduction to Population Health | 4c.

POPH 003 | Justice, Equity, and Ethics in Population Health | 3c.

POPH 101 | History of Population Health | 3c.

POPH 105 | Introduction to Maternal and Child Population Health | 3c.

POPH 106 | Global Environment and Human Welfare | 3c.

POPH 126 | Population Health and the Media | 3c.

POPH 198 | Cancer in the Population | 3c. | Provisional offering

BIOE 396 | Bioengineering Applications in Machine Learning | 3c. | Provisional offering